What Is the Link Between Your Diet & Acne Breakout?

Today, there seem to be two types of people: those who are health conscious and those who are not.  Those who are very mindful of what they put into their body firmly believe that a poor diet is the root cause of the majority of both mental and physical health issues.  Those who are not as cautious about their diet tend not to hold any stock in those ideas. But, can our diet exacerbate some problems or reduce others from occurring?

When it comes to acne breakouts, is there a correlation between an increase in acne and what you eat?  Or are there no scientific facts to back up that claim?  As with most issues, the answer to these questions is not precisely cut and dry, but there is scientific information that seems to agree that you are what you eat in the case of acne breakouts.

What Science Says About Your Diet Causing Acne Breakouts

At present, most medical experts agree that there is not a definitive diet that should be followed to prevent acne breakouts from occurring.  While that may be the case, they also agree that food in moderation and paying attention to how your skin responds when you eat particular foods is wise in determining whether or not you are subject to specific foods causing breakouts.

They are hesitant to reach a definite conclusion on this issue because there are too many variables for the science to be reliable.  For example, if you are very conscientious about your food intake, you may recall having a particular food and then breaking out shortly thereafter.  However, if you do not pay attention to everything you consume, you might not remember having a food that could cause your acne.

Is There Anything Scientists Can Agree On When it Comes to Your Diet Causing Acne?

While there is still debate surrounding this issue, most doctors and scientists can agree that there seems to be a correlation between several different types of food and acne breakouts.

Refined Carbohidrates

Foods that are high in refined carbohydrates show to contribute to skin breakouts. Some foods that contain refined carbs include:

  • Foods made from white flower
  • White rice
  • Sweetened beverages
  • Sugar sweeteners

The science backing this theory is sound.  Carbs like these cause issues with your body’s insulin levels.  When these foods break down, they raise your insulin levels, and, in turn, they tend to block the glands on your face that secrete oil.  Because those glands can’t “breathe,” they clog your pores with oil, causing acne.

One study conducted in the US showed some interesting results in this regard.  Around 2,200 patients were put on a low-carb diet for other health-related issues.  87% of those patients claimed a reduction in acne breakouts during the study.

While this would seem to be definitive evidence to prove that a diet high in carbs causes acne, the study also says that there needs to be further research conducted before that conclusion can be drawn.

Cow’s Milk

Another frequently ingested substance that seemed to make all of the acne-causing foods and beverages list was cow’s milk. In these cases, it did not matter the type of cow’s milk, as all types (whole, 2%, skim) seemed to affect skin breakouts.

One study showed a 44% increase in acne breakouts in women who drank two or more glasses of milk per day.  Another showed that people who drank milk or ate ice cream regularly had breakouts at a rate of four times higher than those who did not. 

The flaw with this theory is that there is no proof as to WHY milk causes breakouts.  Most believe that cow’s milk contains a high amount of hormones, and an imbalance in hormones is a proven factor contributing to acne breakouts. However, it is still not verified that the excess hormones in cow’s milk cause acne.

While the possibility is excellent, most studies agree that more research must be done on the topic before concluding.

What is the Final Recommendation Concerning Diet and Acne Breakouts?

Most doctors and scientists agree that eating a healthy, balanced diet will always be the best answer for any issue regarding your health.  Beyond that, they recommend tracking your food intake and taking note of what you eat and drink (by doing something like keeping a food journal) just before an acne breakout.  Those foods and beverages are probably personal triggers for your skin’s inflammation, and they should be avoided whenever possible.  

While the jury still seems to be out on whether or not your diet can cause acne breakouts, the evidence seems to support that it can.  So eat healthily and avoid trigger foods in excess to prevent unnecessary acne.

 

Bedtime Routine for Better Rest

Sleep is essential, and the quality of your sleep has a significant impact on how you feel throughout the day. Good sleep can help reduce stress, improve mood, and even boost creativity. It’s also been linked to good health overall. 

As your day comes to an end, there are some things you can do to help your mind and body wind down for bed. The routines you follow to get your bedtime started can make a big difference in how well you sleep.

This article discusses some simple bedtime routines that will help ensure better sleep for you tonight!

Why Is Sleep Important?

Sleep is crucial because it’s what allows our body and mind to repair and recharge. You could be sleep-deprived without even knowing it. And if you aren’t getting enough quality sleep, it can affect your mood, mental well-being, and physical health. Why?

When you’re tired, even the slightest things become difficult to accomplish, whether it’s remembering your friend’s name or staying focused on a project at work. Plus, you could just feel awful!

Sleep has also been proven to boost creativity and problem-solving skills. Think about how often creative or innovative ideas come to mind when you’re in bed! It tends to be an ideal place to let your mind wander and process the day’s events.

How Sleep Affects Your Health

As if that wasn’t enough, poor sleep habits can affect your physical health as well. If you don’t get enough quality sleep, it can lead to conditions such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, weight gain, and obesity.

Everyone is different when it comes to sleep needs. However, there are some recommendations for how much sleep people actually need each night.

Generally, these recommendations say that adults should get 7-9 hours of sleep per night. It’s also suggested you go to bed at the same time every night to establish a rhythm that your body can get used to.

What’s The Best Night Routine?

Establishing a perfect bedtime routine can be difficult when your schedule is busy and varies from day to day. Even so, you can still create a general pattern that works for you by following some of these guidelines:

  1. Go to Bed and Wake Up Around the Same Time Each Day – This includes weekends too!
  2. Take Time to Relax – This might include taking a bath, reading, or listening to soft music.
  3. Avoid Using Electronics Before Bed – Don’t watch the news, scroll through your phone, or check email.
  4. Try Not to Nap Too Late in the Day – And if your naps are typically less than 30 minutes during the day, try not to nap at all.
  5. Create a Comfortable Sleep Environment – This might include light shades or earplugs.
  6. Only Use Your Bed for Sleep – Avoid working, studying, or eating in bed.
  7. Don’t Drink Caffeine Too Late in the Day – Coffee, energy drinks and soda can all contain caffeine. Try to stop drinking caffeinated beverages around two hours before bedtime.
  8. Skip the Alcohol – Alcohol may seem like it helps you sleep, but it actually disrupts your sleep cycle. It’s best to avoid drinking before bed!
  9. Get Plenty of Exercise – You probably knew this one was coming! When you exercise during the day, your body craves good sleep to repair and recover.

How To Start a Night Routine?

When you’re tired, it can be challenging to create a routine that works for you. However, it’s crucial to find a pattern that helps you establish good sleep habits.

You may have trouble falling asleep at first if your body isn’t used to going to bed at the same time each night. It can take one to two weeks for your body to adjust, but you’ll feel better by the end!

While you’re figuring out this process, it might also help to work on eliminating any nighttime noises or distractions that keep you up. If the light is an issue, try using a soft sleep mask or black-out curtains.

Once your routine becomes a habit, you’ll start to notice the positive effects on your mood and productivity during the day. Try sticking with a bedtime routine for a few weeks and see how you feel. 

If you still need help sleeping after trying to establish a night routine, talk to your doctor. There may be underlying factors that can keep you from getting a good night’s sleep–like anxiety or insomnia. Once these issues are addressed and resolved, it will be easier for you to build a routine with rest at the center!

Sleep tips: 6 steps to better sleep. (2020, April 17). Mayo Clinic. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/sleep/art-20048379

CDC – Sleep Hygiene Tips – Sleep and Sleep Disorders. (2016, July 15). CDC.Gov. https://www.cdc.gov/sleep/about_sleep/sleep_hygiene.html

A Good Night’s Sleep. (2020, November 3). National Institute on Aging. https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/good-nights-sleep#good

 

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